October112014
michaellogangardner:

The only true way to understand that you’re doing it the hard way is to do it the hard way.

Hard way fo’ lyfe!

michaellogangardner:

The only true way to understand that you’re doing it the hard way is to do it the hard way.

Hard way fo’ lyfe!

6PM

We took Sadie to be bred today. She was so nervous she would wag for the bucks through the fence but clamped her tail down hard when they mounted her. It was her first time. I don’t know if she’s on the front or back end of her heat, but I’ll check her again tomorrow and see if I should take her back. I may have to wait a few more weeks. It’s time to shower though… ew, buck stink.

6PM
rosasay:


These oyster mushrooms look ideal for the saute pan, but they’re at Muir Woods National Monument, where all foraging is prohibited.

From a thoughtful article by Jonah Raskin: The Forager’s Dilemma —- What’s Right, and Wrong, with Gathering Wild Foods?


Oops! That’s one of the places I gathered berries. It was from around the parking lot… So, not technically IN the park, right??

rosasay:

These oyster mushrooms look ideal for the saute pan, but they’re at Muir Woods National Monument, where all foraging is prohibited.

From a thoughtful article by Jonah Raskin: The Forager’s Dilemma —- What’s Right, and Wrong, with Gathering Wild Foods?

Oops! That’s one of the places I gathered berries. It was from around the parking lot… So, not technically IN the park, right??

(via mamisgarden)

6PM

hyggehaven said: I used to be very freaked out by my Reynauds, because it looks and feels like your tissue is dying. In rare cases of extended lack of circulation, it puts one at risk for gangrene: otherwise, it's harmless. The best thing you can do is tell her it's harmless and encourage her to keep hydrated. Weirdly enough, a little fear and stress about the situation helps, because it raises blood pressure.

Thanks. I had her read your response and she said she would keep her water bottle with her at all times this winter. :) it also made her feel better that someone else had this too. You’re a peach.

9AM
9AM
we-are-star-stuff:


Is race biologically real?
A clutch of books published this year argue the question. All miss the point.
Michael Yudell’s Race Unmasked and Robert Sussman’s The Myth of Race can be read as inadvertent retorts to former New York Times journalist Nicholas Wade’s A Troublesome Inheritance, published while the former were in the press. Wade’s book is by far the most insidious, but all three are polemics that become mired in proving (in Wade’s case) or disproving (in the others’) whether race is biological and therefore ‘real’. This question is a dead end, a distraction from what is really at stake in this debate: human social equality.
Race is certainly real — ask any African American. It originated long before the science of genetics, as sets of phenotypes and stereotypes. These correlate with haplotypes, clusters of genetic variation. In this sense, race is genetically ‘real’. But those correlations depend on judgement calls. Wade cites population-genetics studies that identify three principal races: caucasian, African and East Asian. Elsewhere he cites five, adding Australasian and Native American; or seven, splitting caucasians into people from Europe, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. A study in Scientific Reports this year identified 19 “ancestral components”, including Mozabites, Kalash and Uygurs. Palaeogeneticist Svante Pääbo and others have revealed the underlying human genetic variation to be a series of gradients. Whether and how one parses that variation depends on one’s training, inclination and acculturation. So: race is real and race is genetic, but that does not mean that race is ‘really’ genetic.
The completion of the draft human-genome sequence in 2000 led some optimists to forecast the end of race, but use of the term in the biomedical literature has actually increased since then. For clinicians, race is a matter of pragmatism. Although each of us is genetically and epigenetically unique, our ancestry leaves footprints in our genomes. Consequently, clinicians use familiar racial categories such as ‘black’ or ‘Ashkenazi Jewish’ as crude markers of genotypes, in a step towards individualized medicine. For them, the reality of race is immaterial; diagnosis and treatment are what count.
Debates over the genetic reality of race, then, are not mainly scientific, but social. They deploy the cultural authority of science — considered society’s most objective way of understanding the world — as a fig leaf for positions motivated explicitly or implicitly by ideology. All three of these books argue that if the proof or disproof of race is scientific, it must be true. The author must be right. More importantly, his opponents must be wrong.
A full-throated, intellectually rigorous anti-racism must critically assess both biological and cultural evidence about race. It must acknowledge that no work on race science can be free of ideology — and, precisely for that reason, it must not place historical actors before a moral green screen showing an image of contemporary values. Rather, it must set the stage for each scene with meticulous, empathetic historical detail. Such work would allow the scientific study of ‘racial superiority’ — inherently grounded in subjectivity and bias — to fall on its own sword.
[Continue Reading →]

we-are-star-stuff:

Is race biologically real?

A clutch of books published this year argue the question. All miss the point.

Michael Yudell’s Race Unmasked and Robert Sussman’s The Myth of Race can be read as inadvertent retorts to former New York Times journalist Nicholas Wade’s A Troublesome Inheritance, published while the former were in the press. Wade’s book is by far the most insidious, but all three are polemics that become mired in proving (in Wade’s case) or disproving (in the others’) whether race is biological and therefore ‘real’. This question is a dead end, a distraction from what is really at stake in this debate: human social equality.

Race is certainly real — ask any African American. It originated long before the science of genetics, as sets of phenotypes and stereotypes. These correlate with haplotypes, clusters of genetic variation. In this sense, race is genetically ‘real’. But those correlations depend on judgement calls. Wade cites population-genetics studies that identify three principal races: caucasian, African and East Asian. Elsewhere he cites five, adding Australasian and Native American; or seven, splitting caucasians into people from Europe, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. A study in Scientific Reports this year identified 19 “ancestral components”, including Mozabites, Kalash and Uygurs. Palaeogeneticist Svante Pääbo and others have revealed the underlying human genetic variation to be a series of gradients. Whether and how one parses that variation depends on one’s training, inclination and acculturation. So: race is real and race is genetic, but that does not mean that race is ‘really’ genetic.

The completion of the draft human-genome sequence in 2000 led some optimists to forecast the end of race, but use of the term in the biomedical literature has actually increased since then. For clinicians, race is a matter of pragmatism. Although each of us is genetically and epigenetically unique, our ancestry leaves footprints in our genomes. Consequently, clinicians use familiar racial categories such as ‘black’ or ‘Ashkenazi Jewish’ as crude markers of genotypes, in a step towards individualized medicine. For them, the reality of race is immaterial; diagnosis and treatment are what count.

Debates over the genetic reality of race, then, are not mainly scientific, but social. They deploy the cultural authority of science — considered society’s most objective way of understanding the world — as a fig leaf for positions motivated explicitly or implicitly by ideology. All three of these books argue that if the proof or disproof of race is scientific, it must be true. The author must be right. More importantly, his opponents must be wrong.

A full-throated, intellectually rigorous anti-racism must critically assess both biological and cultural evidence about race. It must acknowledge that no work on race science can be free of ideology — and, precisely for that reason, it must not place historical actors before a moral green screen showing an image of contemporary values. Rather, it must set the stage for each scene with meticulous, empathetic historical detail. Such work would allow the scientific study of ‘racial superiority’ — inherently grounded in subjectivity and bias — to fall on its own sword.

[Continue Reading →]

(via hyggehaven)

people 

9AM
biodiverseed:

malformalady:

Raynaud’s is a rare disorder that affects the arteries. Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood from your heart to different parts of your body. Raynaud’s sometimes is called a disease, syndrome, or phenomenon. The disorder is marked by brief episodes of vasospasm , which is a narrowing of the blood vessels. Vasospasm of the arteries reduces blood flow to the fingers and toes. In people who have Raynaud’s, the disorder usually affects the fingers. In about 40 percent of people who have Raynaud’s, it affects the toes. Rarely, the disorder affects the nose, ears, nipples, and lips.
Photo credit: nicolewade14

I have this disorder, and often it makes garden work very difficult, as I periodically lose sensation in my fingers whenever it is colder than ca. 10˚C. If you also have Reynaud’s, or other disorders that cause reduced sensation in your extremities (carpal tunnel, etc.), make sure to wear thick working gloves, especially when working with thorny plants or soil: not just for the heat they provide, but also because you need to protect yourself from sharp objects that you won’t necessarily feel, even if they penetrate the skin.
I also suffer from low blood pressure, which is related to circulation problems. If you have any of these conditions, make sure you carry water with you at all times. Fainting and dizzyiness can be dangerous when you are in precarious outdoor work situations, and managing drops in blood pressure as well as poor circulation has a lot to do with hydration.
I get made fun of a lot for this (because apparently it makes me look like hipster scum), but I often wear a 2 L wine bota filled with water when I go out to fend off the first signs of dehydration and low blood pressure.

#disability #health #PSA


My daughter has this. The ends of her fingers turn white and her lips turn blue/purple. It doesn’t even have to be very cold. If she is exerting herself in cold weather (soccer, running) it happens. When it does, it scares her. Every time.

biodiverseed:

malformalady:

Raynaud’s is a rare disorder that affects the arteries. Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood from your heart to different parts of your body. Raynaud’s sometimes is called a disease, syndrome, or phenomenon. The disorder is marked by brief episodes of vasospasm , which is a narrowing of the blood vessels. Vasospasm of the arteries reduces blood flow to the fingers and toes. In people who have Raynaud’s, the disorder usually affects the fingers. In about 40 percent of people who have Raynaud’s, it affects the toes. Rarely, the disorder affects the nose, ears, nipples, and lips.

Photo credit: nicolewade14

I have this disorder, and often it makes garden work very difficult, as I periodically lose sensation in my fingers whenever it is colder than ca. 10˚C. If you also have Reynaud’s, or other disorders that cause reduced sensation in your extremities (carpal tunnel, etc.), make sure to wear thick working gloves, especially when working with thorny plants or soil: not just for the heat they provide, but also because you need to protect yourself from sharp objects that you won’t necessarily feel, even if they penetrate the skin.

I also suffer from low blood pressure, which is related to circulation problems. If you have any of these conditions, make sure you carry water with you at all times. Fainting and dizzyiness can be dangerous when you are in precarious outdoor work situations, and managing drops in blood pressure as well as poor circulation has a lot to do with hydration.

I get made fun of a lot for this (because apparently it makes me look like hipster scum), but I often wear a 2 L wine bota filled with water when I go out to fend off the first signs of dehydration and low blood pressure.

#disability #health #PSA

My daughter has this. The ends of her fingers turn white and her lips turn blue/purple. It doesn’t even have to be very cold. If she is exerting herself in cold weather (soccer, running) it happens. When it does, it scares her. Every time.

(via hyggehaven)

9AM

silent-wordsmith:

mollymimieux:

Imagine that one day the whole world would look like this.

We don’t belong here; we never have

(Source: boredpanda.com, via intotheurbanwilds)

9AM
dauntingwalnut:

tardis-inwonderland:

betterbemeta:

tastefullyoffensive:

[klaroline]

But you know a protest to this would be to just repeatedly clean the toilet. Just do it. Pretend you’re in a video game and grind toilet cleaning for points.
water and rewater and rewater the plants. Kill the plants. Drown the plants.
Expose the system. Exploit the system. 


Its totally do five loads of laundry.

I am totally doing this to my children. I would just add a rule that each can only be done once within a week.

Parenting gold.

dauntingwalnut:

tardis-inwonderland:

betterbemeta:

tastefullyoffensive:

[klaroline]

But you know a protest to this would be to just repeatedly clean the toilet. Just do it. Pretend you’re in a video game and grind toilet cleaning for points.

water and rewater and rewater the plants. Kill the plants. Drown the plants.

Expose the system. Exploit the system. 

Its totally do five loads of laundry.

I am totally doing this to my children. I would just add a rule that each can only be done once within a week.

Parenting gold.

9AM
monkeyfrog:

This is the inside of a huge fancy atypical spring house, but it makes it easy to get the idea.
There is a sort of trough that holds the spring water. It isn’t deep, usually maybe knee deep or so on an adult. The house is small but usually an adult can stand in there, and in this photo behind your back would be a small amount of dry storage space. Most of them don’t have windows because the whole idea is to keep it cold. That is why they’re typically made of stone or brick as opposed to wood.
I freaking love spring houses. If there was a way to collect them, I’d have a huge collection.

monkeyfrog:

This is the inside of a huge fancy atypical spring house, but it makes it easy to get the idea.

There is a sort of trough that holds the spring water. It isn’t deep, usually maybe knee deep or so on an adult. The house is small but usually an adult can stand in there, and in this photo behind your back would be a small amount of dry storage space. Most of them don’t have windows because the whole idea is to keep it cold. That is why they’re typically made of stone or brick as opposed to wood.

I freaking love spring houses. If there was a way to collect them, I’d have a huge collection.

9AM
6AM
6AM

nubbsgalore:

the wwf’s living planet report 2014, which discovered that we’ve lost half of all the world’s wildlife in the past fourty years, showed more specifically that the population of common dormice dropped by 43 percent between 1993 and 2010.

not only are dormice vulnerable to habitat loss, but they’re hesitant to cross open fields, and the grubbing out of hedgerows in recent decades has removed the wildlife corridors between woods that has allowed the dormice to move more freely to new habitat.  

dormice have very specialized diets of berries and nuts, and with less habitat they are unable to seek out enough food to fatten up before their six month hibernation (which was featured in these two posts). 

photos by (click pic) andrea zampatti, richard austin xmiroslav hlávkobengt lundberg, david kjaer and ingo ardnt

This reminds me of our vacation this summer. As I was picking blackberries and a little bird sat in the bush eating as well. Then another time a tiny squirrel was basically yelling at me for eating the ripe ones on the branch he sat on. Michael said I needed to stop taking their food. Such a dilemma!

(via waeshael)

5AM
“What do you mean, “what can I do?” You can participate. You can connect. You can get actively involved. You can turn off the tv. You can cancel the Disney vacation and buy bushels of tomatoes to can or turn into salsa. You can get some pots and grow a pot garden… of vegetables. You can put a beehive on the roof of your house. Just like today— whatever today looks like— is the manifestation of billions of individual decisions accumulated over time, tomorrow will be too. We must stop this incessant victimhood mentality. Somebody else will not fix things. Somebody else will not make me healthy. Somebody else will not make me happy. These things are my responsibility. Not the neighbor’s, not the government’s, not the church or the civic club.” Joel Salatin (via outdoor-anarchy)

(via transpyro)

October102014
There are some funny daily calanders out there.

There are some funny daily calanders out there.